Going off grid

Whew, what a whirlwind last day it has been.

I ended up getting a ride to Hana/the farm from some folks at the farm who were picking up two other workers from the airport. Rode out there in the back of a pickup (the perfect way to ride the Road to Hana) and got there with time to set up my tent, unpack, breathe for a minute, and go to sleep. We got there in the dark, so I did misplace my campsite in the winding trails for a bit, but in the morning, I got situated.

I’m camped right next the cliffs overlooking the ocean, with strong waves crashing against the rocks below. There is a trail down there, so once I get used to the tides, I’ll head down and do some fishing. Who knows, might even try from the cliff, but I kind of think that would be too much line out. We’ll see. The yoga platform also overlooking the sea is just around the bend, and I’m sufficiently away from the main house (“house” meaning shack with a bit of solar/battery power for a couple lights, a gas stove and nothing else).

Meaning this farm is OFF THE GRID big time — no electricity, running water, cell phone service. Which I’m cool with. I do have internet/computer things I need to be able to work on while doing farm work, but that can wait until another farm. For now, it seems a great centering space.

The land is also very sacred land to the locals; it seems it is an ancient burial ground of some sort. I’m still learning about it. It is also not “a farm” really, at this point. Meaning I and folks like me have been/are making it one. There are a a few chickens, a small amount of garden space (the family farm easily has more land devoted to garden currently). When I brought up the thought of structure building & clay/coffee can stove building and saw the looks I got, I could tell that I’m going to be very valuable, as far as what I can do/want to do.

Right now at the farm it’s Anna, who has been out there a couple of months and is (until Ben, the owner gets back) the one in the know (they’re in a new cycle, as far as workers go). Pooh, the neighbor, is a an old hippy who I swear I’ve met somewhere before (she thought so as well) — possibly it was in Eugene back in the mid 90’s, perhaps at Country Fair. Sometimes we drive her to work, and she helps a bit at the farm. Kate & Michael were picked up with me; Michael just flew in, Kate randomly met him at the airport and decided a farm sounded pretty neat. Jordan (I think his name was; only met him briefly before I had to head back to “the other side,” as the rest of Maui is known) showed up after us and get this: he took a cab from the airport. Whew, he’s a young’un for sure. 280$ cab ride, and the last of his funds. Anna and I are going to try to teach him a bit of common sense. 😉 I hear there are a couple more folks coming in this week, but guess we’ll see.

Hana, the town, I have not been to yet. But we did stop by some of the major community gathering points on the way to the other side today, so I got a chance to meet some of the community, and have been told that “everyone knows who you are already,” as far as workers arriving on the farm. Meaning it’s not a highly populated area. Which is perfect for me. If everything is as it sounds, I think I might be spending a long time in Hana, even if I move farms at some point.

It also sounds like I will be able to get work in my off time on other farms. Anna said she’d introduce me to folks with opportunities for that, and also to the boar hunters, since I made it known that after a while — and after I have fashioned a proper spear — I would like to hunt boar with some who know what they are doing/know the locale/boar hunting.  Don’t want to get gored.

COST OF LIVING should be dropping significantly. While there isn’t much food on the farm, there is some, and they do provide some, so that will drop costs considerably. I will still have to patronize establishments to use internet/charge electronic gizmos (if I stay there more than a month or two, I will need to get a battery I can plug into/charge off the truck, or something, as I have things on the computer I do still need to do…but this works for now).

One neat thing about this all is that I find I’m actually, for the moment, probably the most experienced person there, as far as farm/forest awareness. I find myself completely accepted, with comments of “oh, you’re going to do WELL here” already. Guess showing hustle (I forgot my blankets on the beach when they picked me up, so instead of walking back from the store while they shopped, I ran. And got back well before anyone was done. Surprised the hell out of them), knowledge and a mature mind means something here. Finally. I think my asking about what the soil was like (and then having to explain the different types of soil I was trying to differentiate between) was also a good thing.

There’s going to be a bit of segue as I clear my mind from this time in the more urban areas, but I like where that all will be going. I do picture many building projects, and I made sure they have seeds so that I can start spreading the growing area, as it is not that big at this point; seems the farm has been in a bit of tumult, as the owner has been gone for months, due to a water bacteria sickness of some sort.

I was a bit worried about “did I choose the right spot” — but after seeing the space/energy/people…I’m feeling good about this. It’s a gateway into Hana, and other farms/getting to know the area…but it’s also a very splendid energy space of healing that I think is exactly what I need.


Nevyn Nowhere is an Oregon-born, Maui-living musician producing work under the umbrella title of Sad Music for Happy Humans. Originally posted on Nevyn’s personal blog, this is reposted here, with minor editing, with his direct permission. You can find Nevyn Nowhere on WordPress and Soundcloud, in addition to his website.

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